Art May 22, 2012 By Natasha Phillips

Advertisement for <em>Loulou</em>, Cacharel perfume, 1990. Photograph by Sarah Moon.

Ad for Loulou, Cacharel perfume, 1990. Photograph by Sarah Moon.

delpiretitle Robert Delpire
Robert Delpire is an exceptional figure in the international photography, design and advertising world. As a publisher, curator, editor, art director and film producer, he has championed the cause of some of the most notable and iconic image makers of the last century. His career began in 1950’s Paris, as a young medical student he was presented with the opportunity to produce the school’s bulletin which led him into the world of image making. Early success transformed his journey and he never looked back. With an innate aesthetic sense and an incisive understanding of design and graphics, he championed the career of many of the world’s master photographers, including Joself Koudelka, William Klein, Duane Michals, Robert Frank, Henri Cartier Bresson, Guy Bourdin, Paolo Roversi and Sarah Moon.

Within a few years he established what became one of the most important graphic design and photography publishing companies of the time: ´Editions Delpire. Early on Delpire published the first monograph of Brassai, and several books with Magnum photographers including Cartier Bresson, who would remain a life long friend and collaborator. In 1958, when an American publisher proved difficult to secure, Delpire published Les Americains, Robert Frank’s radical and sometimes controversial photo essay. An honest depiction of American life, it was widely celebrated and considered one of the most important monographs of the 20th century. He also produced the ground breaking William Klein monographs of Tokyo,
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Art May 14, 2012 By Sarah Coleman

<em>Texas Mud Pie, Hands and Feet (self-portrait)</em>, 2012 C-print ©Rachel Lee Hovnavian

Texas Mud Pie, Hands and Feet (self-portrait), 2012 C-print

mudpietitle Mud Pie
Are the Internet and social media making us more, or less social? Smarter or dumber? Are you going to make it through this review before clicking over to check your email, Twitter account, Facebook page, or blog site? How many people “liked” your status update today?

Artist Rachel Lee Hovnavian is fascinated by the social transformations wrought by the virtual world. Mud Pie, her new show at the Leila Heller Gallery, is all about how we seem increasingly happy to forgo real experience in favor of the virtual and artificial. This could be a dry, heavy-handed message, but Hovnavian delivers it with such sly humor and visual panache that even the most committed technophiles might have to admit she’s on to something.

Take the show’s centerpiece, a supposedly romantic dinner for two. A long dining table is elegantly set with all the expected signifiers: flowers, candles, wineglasses. But the couple itself is virtual, represented by two LCD screens. The man and woman on the screens don’t speak to each other. Instead, each seems perfectly satisfied to interact with a mobile device while beeps, trills and the Angry Birds soundtrack punctuate the silence. Oh, and those flowers? They’re artificial. Naturally.

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Art May 4, 2012 By Sara Roffino

Holton Rower at <em>The Hole</em> 312 Bowery New York, NY

Holton Rower at The Hole 312 Bowery New York, NY

holtonrowertitle Holton Rower

After five years in seclusion, Holton Rower is emerging with a solo show in New York City. His pour paintings, on display at The Hole through May 26th, are vibrant displays of acrylic paint left mostly to its own devices. Standing above large planks, Rower pours paint down thick wooden protrusions, allowing the paint to grow, or not, as wood blocks and other obstacles permit. Though at first the method seems simple, Rower has refined the process and his technical skills to an extent that intention and spontaneity are evident in equal measure in the work.

Upon entering The Hole, visitors are welcomed by the simplest of Rower’s works. The paintings in this room consist of fewer colors, layered in rings up to an inch wide. The paint retains its separateness from the surrounding rings, resulting in smoother lines and more definition. The works in the second room employ more colors applied in thin rings, with colors mixing and forming intricate designs, begetting a comparison to a topographical map of mountainous lands. The third room contains five titanic works, some with protrusions, cut-outs, and seemingly several points from which paint was applied, creating contiguous, vaguely defined abstract rings of color. This room feels a bit like the grand finale on the Fourth of July; the biggest, brightest and most complex work of the show is here, though these are not necessarily the most thoughtful or compelling pieces.

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Art April 18, 2012 By Editors

Arhuaco Man, Colombia 2011 © Robert Presutti

Arhuaco Man, Colombia 2011 © Robert Presutti

robertpheader Robert Presutti
Robert Presutti is one of this year’s Global Travel photo contest winners. He has been working and living in New York City for the past 18 years. A large part of his work is dedicated to travel. Assignments have taking him to countries like Italy, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Georgia, Japan, Mexico, Colombia etc… In the past two years he has been working on two major projects, one in Colombia, in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta with the Kogi and Arhuaco indians for a future exhibit at the Smithsonian and the other project in Georgia with the nuns of the Phoka monastery. Robert also contributes to the New York Times regularly.

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Art April 18, 2012 By Editors

Four boys running down Dirt Road, Omo Valley, Ethiopia. © Andrew Geiger

Four boys running down Dirt Road, Omo Valley, Ethiopia. © Andrew Geiger

geigerheaderV3 Andrew Geiger
Andrew Geiger placed second in the portrait category of this year’s Global Travel Photo Contest with an image from his ongoing work documenting the many vanishing cultures of the world. Geiger recently returned from the Rajasthan region of India, where he witnessed the inevitable disappearance of its traditional dress and ancient customs. “I have realized from my travels that documenting these places and people will be the only way for my children to experience the native customs the younger generation from these places are shunning,” he tells PLANET. Although he travels extensively, Geiger still has yet to find a place as beautiful and special as his home state of Montana, where he lives with his family.

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Art April 17, 2012 By Editors

THIRD PLACE © Lung Liu Lung

THIRD PLACE © Lung Liu Lung

title87 Lung Liu Lung
Lung Liu won fourth place in the portrait category of our 4th Annual Global Travel Photo Contest. Liu is a photographer working out of Vancouver, Canada who’s produced in-depth studies of Thailand, Vietnam, and Haiti after the earthquake. He was born in Vietnam between two conflicts, and spent time in a refugee camp as a child before being sponsored by a church to live in Canada. A road trip down the majestic US west coast inspired him to travel internationally for photography.

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Art April 16, 2012 By Editors

THIRD PLACE © Juliette Charvet

THIRD PLACE © Juliette Charvet

headerjuliettecharvette Juliette Charvet
Juliette Charvet placed third in the general category of our 4th annual Global Travel Photo Contest. Juliette is a French photographer based in New York City, specializing in street and travel photography. After graduating from the Paris School of Journalism, she spent over a year in Vietnam and Lebanon, perfecting her photographic skills at the news agency AFP. She now travels extensively with her camera, always trying to capture the world in its most comprehensive authenticity. “To me, travel photography is about seeing our surroundings with wonderment,” she says.

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Art April 13, 2012 By Editors

THIRD PLACE © Ian Spanier

THIRD PLACE © Ian Spanier

spaniernewheader Ian Spanier
Ian Spanier placed third in the portrait category of our 3rd Annual Global Travel Photo Contest. Ian Spanier, a NY based photograper, began taking photographs at six years old when his parents gave him his first point and shoot camera. Ian’s first full book of published work, Playboy, a Guide to Cigars arrived in cigar shops November 2009 and the public version hit retail stores Spring 2010. The book is a collection of his photographs made in six countries spanning two and a half years. His newest book project, Local Heroes: America’s Volunteer Fire Fighters, a collection of portraits made across the US is due out Fall 2012. Ian credits much of his inspiration to the original masters of photography as they shot what they saw. For him, there is no “one” subject that he photographs; he also chooses to shoot what he sees.

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Art April 11, 2012 By Aiya Ono

Courtesy of Salvage Memory Project

Courtesy of Salvage Memory Project

headerlostandfoundnew Lost and Found
March 11th, 2011 was an unforgettable day for those who witnessed their homes, their schools, and their neighborhoods get swallowed by a massive tsunami. All things familiar disappeared in just a few minutes, leaving people in utter shock. In the town of Yamamoto in Miyagi prefecture, 50% of its surface area was flooded, damaging more than 4,000 buildings. Lying in the mountains of debris were years and years of personal photographs, physical archives of memories that were once taken for granted.

Two months after the quake, research students of the Japan Society for Socio-Information Studies. traveled to Yamamoto and began to collect these photographs and albums. The “Salvage Memory Project” quickly caught the attention of professional archivists and photographers through Twitter and other social media sites, and they offered to help. The task was extremely cumbersome and tedious. The volunteers discovered 750,000 photographs, which were cleaned and put into Google’s image archive service Picasa. With Picasa’s technology, the Salvage Memory Project was able to create a system in which photographs could be searched by either facial recognition or keyword. As a result, out of 750,000 photographs recovered, 19,200 were returned to their owners.

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Art April 10, 2012 By Editors

GRAND PRIZE Abyssinian Angel, Ethiopia, William Palank

GRAND PRIZE Abyssinian Angel, Ethiopia, William Palank

newheaderpalank William J Palank
William J Palank is an environmental portrait photographer based out of San Francisco. His love for international travel and little-known places started after his birth on a US Air Force Base in France, when he was given a free ride in the cargo hold of a military transport airplane at the age of two weeks. Palank is also a fine art printer and a teacher for Leica Akademie North America.

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